“This Is The Rough Hewn Trio – Now Available On Bandcamp

Happy New Year.  It’s been a bit since there was a post.  This won’t really count as one either.  It’s just a short update with a few announcements.

1.  This (my instrumental trio project with Drummer Craig Bunch and Chapman Stick / Warr Guitarist Chris Lavender)

rough-hewn-cover-web

is out now on Bandcamp (https://roughhewntrio.bandcamp.com/releases).  You can pay what you want to purchase it.   I don’t think my friend Andre would mind me stealing his FB description, “proggy, fusiony, ambient-tinged deliciousness in a Holdsworth / Zappa / Crimson vein”.  It’s got all sorts of influences floating through it, and it’s fun for the whole family.  You can stream it for free (up to 3 times) or pay what you want to purchase it.  I hope you’ll check it out!

guitarchitect_back-web

2.  I LOVE Vimeo, but it’s a little too restrictive for SOME (good) people – so I’ll have a YOUTUBE channel up soon.  I’ll put some never before seen (and heard) things up there.  Maybe I’ll even put up a clip of my “Salt Licks” guitar instructional video I shot with my good friend Randy Bird at Berklee. : )  Maybe not.  We’ll see….I’ll announce specifics here once I get some content up.

3.  The second KoriSoron 5-track EP  is done in terms of music.  Big thanks to John Chiara at Albany Audio Associates for going above and beyond!  Farzad from KoriSoron is working on the CD graphics and I expect that we’ll have that out by the end of the month or February.

4.  I’ll have some of my back catalog up online in the weeks ahead as well.

5.  I’m just finishing up pre-production for my solo acoustic release tenatively titled, “Eel – Ecch – Trick – A – Coup – Stick”  It’s a WIDE swath of music and might cover 2 CDs.  I’m hoping to release it in the Spring or Summer depending on whether it becomes a full length or 2 EPs.

6.  I’m back into electric playing these days and pulling something together along the lines of Hassan Hakmoun’s Zahar performance on Night Flight with Hahn Rowe and Yuval Gabay and mixed in with some of the Balkan & Middle Eastern music I don’t suspect I’ll ever get away from.  Right now the goal is Ass Shakin’ music with burning guitar and vocals.

7.  I’ve been thinking a LOT about this website and the purposes (and people) it is supposed to serve.  In a re-branding initiative this year, I suspect that this blog will remain and another site may come up in its place, but completely re-working this may be an option as well.  File that under “Summer Project”.

Some other things afoot too tentative to mention here, so that’s it for now.  I really hope you’ll check out the Rough Hewn EP!

As always – thanks for reading!

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“New” Recordings Announced for 2016

Hi Everyone!

Hapy pre-4th of July for those of you who live in the states.  This is just a quick update of recent developments for projects I’m working on.  I should have a new post up within the week.

Rough Hewn Trio (!!)

File deeply under “The power of perseverance” following an intensive several days of digital intervention with Craig Bunch – the Rough Hewn trio tracks recorded at Chez Bunch’s with Stick / Warr guitar player Chris Lavender and myself back in 2011 will FINALLY see the light of day.

The 3-song ep will include a new Malian guitar inspired re-working of Bloodsucker, Chris Lavender’s 232 and a Zappa-inspired original I penned, Jerry goes to Frankiewood, aka When Hollywood went to Frankie. 

We had a version of Carl Stalling’s Powerhouse that we tracked but the file got corrupted (along with some of the other tracks we revisited).  I MAY have a demo version that we can put up online as a hidden track (the danger of not finishing something immediately is that it takes FOREVER to get done) – but nevertheless – man am I psyched for some of this stuff to get out into the world.

In the meantime, here’s a video of the Rough Hewn Trio playing Bloodsucker live (it is unbelievable to me just how much footage of us exists ALL with Craig Bunch front and center and no one else in camera shot!)

I’ll have ordering information up once this is released (Initial mixing is done.  We have another revision and then mastering and duplication – I expect it’ll be out in August or September 2016).


Onibaba

Bassist and Composer Daren Burns released the first part of this session (Consisting of several short individual pieces) several years ago but the second half of the session (one continuous take of several different pieces) just got mastered and will get released this Fall.

From Daren Burns’ description on Vimeo:

“Onibaba exists between composition and improvisation and is described as being somewhere between the light and the dark, the ethereal and the earthly – Creative Music. Created by Daren Burns in 2006, the band synthesizes its sound by using elements of the Chicago avant-garde, jazz, rock, world, techno, noise, and classical, to create a new type of fusion that is definitely not the smooth, funky jazz of the 80’s and 90’s, but a new living music.

Here are some videos from a performance in 2010


Onibaba is:

Daren Burns – bass

Craig Bunch – drums (in the videos Joe Berardi – drums)

Scott Collins – guitar

Vinny Golia – woodwinds

Kio Griffith – live video

Geroge McMullen – trombone

© Urban Nerds 2010″


KoriSoron

We’ve completed initial tracking for Five tunes for our second EP with John Chiara recording.  Our first Ep was a live EP but for this one we wanted to incorporate more production (while still maintaining live energy).  The most intensive material in our set will be on this one!  We’ll be continuing to record and mix this summer.  We hope to have the EP out by September / October of this year.

We have shows booked for September (including a TEDx Schenectady event) and October and expect to have additional shows booked soon for later this fall.


Solo Acoustic

“Eel-Ech!-trick-a-coup-stick” – is the tentative title of a solo acoustic instrumental recording I’ve been working on.  Tracking in August and released this Fall.  Right now there’s a Celtic / Bluegrass flatpicking piece, a Mali-inspired fingerstyle piece, a 2-handed piece, a loop / improv based work and possibly – an obscure instrumental cover.


Mas!

There are some other REALLY COOL things in the pipeline!  I’ll fill you in as soon as I can.

Thanks for your patience and thanks for reading  I’m really excited about all of the things coming out this year and I look forward to sharing it with you!

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GuitArchitecture Clinic & KoriSoron Concert HVCC Saturday April 23rd

For those of you who live in update NY – Hudson Valley Community College is putting on a really cool day and a half guitar event on April 22nd and 23rd.

I’ll be doing a one hour clinic on Saturday, April 23rd on “Adaptive guitar – applying World music to guitar” and helping close out the day with a concert by KoriSoron.  I’m really excited by this clinic as I’ll be essentially hacking the presentation and demonstrating a number of approaches that can help with rapid skill acquisition in any area (but especially guitar).

Tickets are $20 – which gets you access to all events for both days (or free for Hudson Valley Community College students, faculty and staff with ID (ticket required)).

Tickets available online at Brown Paper Tickets or call (518) 629-8071 for tickets and information.

There are a lot of great workshops and performances planned – and honestly the $20 price tag is a fraction of what a private lesson with any of these people would cost you – so it’s a steal.

Here’s a schedule of the two days events from the HVCC website:

Guitar Festival
Friday, April 22, 2016

The Hudson Valley Community College Guitar Festival is a celebration of electric, steel, and nylon string guitar styles and bass guitar with acclaimed workshop facilitators, guitarists and luthiers from the Capital Region. Events include workshops, jam sessions and concerts featuring blues, bluegrass, classical, flamenco, gypsy jazz, rock and roll, and roots styles.
Madison Peruzzi “Guitar Set-up & Maintenance”
10 – 11 a.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1

Morning Blues Jam with Super 400
10 – 11:30 a.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Auditorium
Don’t miss this special opportunity to jam with Lori Friday, Kenny Hohman and Joe Daley – or just come by to listen!

Monica Roach “Intro to Jazz Bass”
10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B
During this workshop we will discuss the different styles of electric bass performance. We also will explore “playing in the pocket” and its versatility.

Madison Peruzzi “Guitar Effects & Pedals”
11 a.m. – Noon

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1

Lori Friday “Electric Bass for Beginners: Let’s Get Rockin’!”
Noon – 1 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B
Build a solid foundation on the bass with Lori Friday of Super 400. We’ll introduce the tools every electric bassist needs: hand positioning, fingers vs picking, riffs, locking with the drums, and more. We’ll end the session by playing the Cream classic, Sunshine of Your Love,” with varying levels of technique to suit intermediate players as well.

Kenny Hohman of Super 400 “Get Started on Slide Guitar”
Noon – 1 p.m.
Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 3
This workshop will be geared toward guitarists looking to add slide playing to their trick bag. It will cover the required gear, basic right and left hand techniques, and how to use open tunings as well as standard tuning in an effective way, with examples of classic slide parts to get you on your way.

Thomasina Winslow “Acoustic Blues”
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1

Bernie Mulleda “Intro to Gypsy Jazz”
1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 3
Bernie Mulleda will cover the basics of Gypsy Jazz rhythm and lead guitar styles.

Joe Lowry “Pentatonic and the Blues”
1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B
A look into Major and Minor Pentatonic scales in blues. “Its all about the feeling.”

Chris Chapman “Metal”
2 – 3 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1

Open Mic hosted by Caroline Motherjudge
2 – 5 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Auditorium
All musical acts welcome – solo, duo or band. Be part of the show that features YOU! Sign up in advance to secure your spot or join us on the day of the event.
To sign up for Open Mic, go to www.facebook.com/hvccguitarfest.

Chuck D’Aloia “Blues With Brains & Beyond: Shortcuts Into More Complex Harmony”
3 – 4 p.m.
Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 3

Graham Tichy “American Roots Electric Guitar”
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B
Graham Tichy will cover the techniques and music theory to jump start an exploration into the mid-century music styles of Rockabilly, Western Swing, Jump Blues, Swing, Honky Tonk, Rhythm and Blues, and Rock and Roll. Workshop participants will learn how to get an authentic tone from any instrument, and gain useful advice on how to approach practice and study for a lifetime of progress.

Guitar Festival
Saturday, April 23, 2016

Madison Peruzzi “Guitar Set-up & Maintenance”
10 – 11 a.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1

Mike Collins/Eric Marczak “More Than Just Wire & Wood”
10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Auditorium
Luthiers Collins and Marczak discuss the fine art of guitar building.

Maria Zemantauski “Intro to Flamenco Guitar”
10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 3
This class will focus on rasqueado, the rhythmically precise chord strumming style specific to Flamenco guitar. Maria will introduce basic rasqueado patterns within the compas (rhythmic structure) of farruca and rumba.

Mark Gamsjager “Rockabilly Guitar”
10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B

Madison Peruzzi “Guitar Effects & Pedals”
11 a.m. – Noon

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1

David LaPlante “A History of the Spanish Guitar” with performance demonstrations by Christopher Gotzenberg
Noon – 1 p.m.
Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Auditorium

Chris Chapman & Jamie Juron “Metal: Putting It Together”
Noon – 1 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B
Assault On The Living guitarists demonstrate their approach to collaborating.

Bernie Mulleda “Intro to Gypsy Jazz”
Noon – 1 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 3
Bernie Mulleda will cover the basics of Gypsy Jazz rhythm and lead guitar styles.

Sten Isachsen “Brazilian Guitar Styles”
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1
Sten Isachsen explores chord progressions, rhythms and arrangements for solo guitar.

Harry George Pellegrin “Is Ferdinando Carulli Your Right Hand Man?”
1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Auditorium
Harry George Pellegrin compares the pedagogical works of Carulli’s Opus 114 to Giuliani’s 120 and Carlevaro’s Cuaderno No. 2

Mike Dimin “The Art of Solo Bass”
1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B
It is so much more than the sight of a lone bassist on stage. It’s an exploration into the interconnectedness of the melody, harmony and rhythm, through our instrument – the bass. Be a complete musician, not “just the bass player.”

Scott Collins “Adaptive Guitar: Applying World Music to the Guitar”
1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 3
In this hands-on session, Scott Collins will guide you through the process of how to take music from other cultures and adapt it into your own songs and/or solos.

Gary Cellucci “Rock Guitar: Soloing and Improvisation Techniques”
2 – 3 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1
This workshop will help guitarists explore pentatonic scales, arpeggios, and modes over various types of chord progressions in a rock context. Learn how to develop solos with tone, phrasing, theme, variation, and other improvisational techniques. All experience levels are welcome and participation is strongly encouraged.

Mike McMann “Bluegrass Breakdown”
3 – 4 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 3
Explore Bluegrass guitar techniques,including rhythm playing, solos, melodies, scales, cross-picking, and flatpicking in the styles of Doc Watson and Tony Rice. Hands-on; bring your guitar.

Chuck D’Aloia “Blues With Brains & Beyond: Shortcuts Into More Complex Harmony”
3 – 4 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Viking Video Studio B

GX3+ in concert
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Auditorium
Ray Andrews, Sten Isachsen & Maria Zemantauski collaborate to create something totally unique: GX3+. The name GX3+ refers to the the fact that they play (at least) three very different guitars – flamenco, classical and Baroque – plus mandolin, charango, guilele, cajons (percussion boxes), banjo, and mountain dulcimer. The result is innovative arrangements of the traditional, classical and Latin repertoire, plus stunning, original compositions by Maria Z, arranged for the trio.

Christopher Gotzenberg “Classical Guitar: It’s not just music from old dead guys!”
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Meeting Room 1
The classical guitar has a large repertoire, with music from the Medieval era all the way to current day. Most people associate “Classical” music by composers from days gone by, but some of the most interesting music we have is being composed today. This lecture-recital features music by living composers; Moller, Brouwer, Assad, and Pasieczny. Oh, and it’s not atonal, so don’t be afraid!

Korisoron in concert
5 – 6 p.m.

Bulmer Telecommunications Center, Auditorium
An instrumental acoustic trio combining rock and progressive influences with musical traditions from across the globe. Guitarists Scott Collins and Farzad Golpayegani along with percussionist Dean Mirabito take the stage.

New KoriSoron Release Now Available Online

Hi Everyone,

Just a quick announcement – we hope to have the physical copies of our new live ep:

A (Live)

A(Live)-Poster

Graphic and Logo by Farzad Golpayegani

out by the end of the year but, for anyone interested,  the digital lossless (i.e. full quality AIF) tracks are available on BandCamp here for $5.

We decided to try to make it an accurate demonstration of what we do live, so there are very few digital interventions in the final tracks and, instead, just documented a live performance with a lot of improvisation that happened on the day we tracked it.

We also decided that since what we do is a live performance with acoustic amps and signal processing, that we would incorporate that into the final recording.  So rather than try to capture a pristine acoustic guitar sound, John Chiara, the engineer, used a combination of mics on the guitar and signals from the amp (direct off of Farzad’s ZT acoustic lunchbox), I had an LR Baggs session DI in the effects loop of my lunchbox and ran a DI out of that.

You can stream the recording for free, but any purchases help us record and document more material and we have a lot of cool material that we’ve been developing.

So your support is appreciated!  Even if you like our facebook page (facebook.com/korisoron) and share the link to the bandcamp page – it helps us get the word out about what we do.

We wanted to record our first release live to document what we do! Live we use some signal processing to get our tones across and we decided to not shy away from the acoustic-electric aspect of what we do.

for more information – see our webpage – korisoron.com or our facebook page facebook.com/korisoron

credits

Scott Collins – Guitar and loops
Farzad Golpayegani – Guitar, loops and violin
Dean Mirabito – Percussion

Recorded by John Chiara at Albany Audio Associates on November 15th 2015.

Mixed and mastered by John Chiara

Artwork, logo and design by Farzad Golpayegani

Special thanks to ZT Amps for their support!

As always, thanks for reading!  Look for another (regularly scheduled) GuitArchitecture post soon.

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GuitArchitecture Book Sale – Print Books 25% off on Lulu until August 17!

GuitArchitecture Print Book Sale

Hi Everyone!

I just wanted to let you know that if you’ve been on the fence about picking up one of my guitar reference/instructional books like:

Melodic Patterns (333 Pages)

melodic-patterns“Scott Collins’ GuitArchitecture method replaces the standard approach to learning guitar, rote memorization, with a simple, intuitive two-string approach that anyone can learn. This method, where players can actually see scales on a fingerboard, is called sonic visualization, and it can be applied to any scale or modal system.

In this volume of the GuitArchitecture series, The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Modes: Melodic Patterns, Scott has used his two-string method to create a reference book of thousands of melodic variations. With this information, you, the reader, will be able to create a near infinite number of unique riffs and melodic phrases, which you can use individually or combined to compose or improvise your own music. The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Modes: Melodic Patterns is an invaluable resource for both guitarists and bassists.”

Harmonic Combinatorics (410 pages)

harmonic-combinatorics“In this book of the GuitArchitecture series, The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Modes: Harmonic Combinatorics, Scott explains how to construct and analyze chords and how to create thousands of variations and progressions from a single chord using his unique visualization method. Harmonic Combinatorics is a vast harmonic and melodic resource for guitarists. With this approach, you can create an almost infinite number of unique melodic phrases and harmonic devices to compose or improvise your own music.”

Chord Scales (190 Pages)

guitarchitect-2“In The GuitArchitect’s Guide To Chord Scales, Scott Collins shows you how to make your own scales to use over chords and how to derive chords from whatever scales you come up with in an easy, intuitive and musical way. Over the course of its 190 pages, the Guide To Chord Scales not only offers extensive instruction and approaches, but also acts as a reference book covering chord scale options ranging from 3 notes right on up to the full 12-note chromatic. While devised as a guitar resource for instructional, compositional and/or improvisational material – this book can be a vital component in any musician’s library.”

Positional Exploration (254 pages)

positional-exploration“In this book of the GuitArchitecture series, The GuitArchitect’s Positional Exploration, Scott uses an introductory chromatic guitar exercise to reveal deep possibilities that exist not only in positional visualization, but also in technical awareness and development. The GuitArchitect’s Positional Exploration shows how to take a simple idea and modify it through melodic, harmonic and rhythmic variations that you can then apply to your own music.

Symmetrical 12 Tone Patterns (284 Pages)

12 Tone Cover small“In The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Symmetrical Twelve-Tone Patterns, Scott Collins has taken the approaches from his Melodic Patterns and Guide To Chord Scales books and applied them to a rigorous examination of twelve-tone patterns that can be used for melodic, harmonic, improvisational or compositional resources. Eschewing a reliance on academic jargon, Symmetrical Twelve-Tone Patterns investigates the material in an intuitive and accessible way that will help players access new sounds in their playing.”

or

The Minor Pentatonic Scale (105 pages)

Minor Pent Front“Scott Collins’ GuitArchitecture method replaces the standard approach to learning guitar (rote memorization) with a simple, intuitive two-string approach that anyone can learn. This method, where players can actually see scales on a fingerboard, is called “sonic visualization”, and it can be applied to ANY scale or modal system. In this volume of his Fretboard Visualization series, Scott has used his two-string method to present the pentatonic minor scale in an easy, intuitive and musical manner. This book not only demonstrates how to “see” the scale all over the fingerboard, but also shows how to use the scale in a variety of contexts and presents strategies that can be applied to making any scale more musical. The Fretboard Visualization Series: The Pentatonic Minor Scale is an invaluable resource for guitarists who are looking to break through to the next level in their playing.”

You’re in Luck!

If you order a print edition of my books through LULU.com (click on the book graphics above for direct links) and enter the code GWW25 through August 17th – you’ll receive 25% off on the book!

(Full disclosure – my profit margin is much higher on my PDFs than it on my print editions.  I make more money selling PDFs and that’s what some readers want.  For me, it’s much more useful to be able to have a physical book on a music stand while playing.  With that in mind, I generally encourage people to get the print edition, so this is an amazing deal on books that are already a bargain for pricing!)

So, to clarify,  the sale is only on lulu (http://lulu.com/guitarchitecture) and only until 8/17!  Special thanks to Lulu for offering the deep discount!

I hope this helps and, as always, thanks for reading!

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Reconnecting by De-connecting

Back in the saddle again….

I’ve been off guitarchitecture for a while.  I posted a new podcast on guitagrip.com, and have taken on a few other projects (I’m the musical director/foley jockey for a new production at Siena College that starts in a few weeks, picked up new students, worked on some consultations for other projects, booked some new korisoron shows, worked with ZT amps for some videos we’ll be doing to promote their awesome acoustic amps and related material).  But more importantly related to my absence here, I’ve noticed some severe attention deficit for my interactions with various things.

In addition to trying to be mindful of the fact that multiple options typically leads to overwhelm and inactivity rather than making better choices – I still found myself struggling with finding time to work out or read a book.  These two activities in particular also happen to be things that are very grounding for me.

So clearly something wasn’t working.  In analyzing my actions, I realized that much of my day was spent working under the illusion of being proactive (checking e-mail repeatedly for example) with being reactive (now forcing myself to react to an email with an immediate urgency for something that wasn’t even an issue a minute earlier).

It’s the illusion of getting something done in a timely manner, but it sabotages short and long term goals.

Physician Heal Thyself

In a recent lesson, I gave a student the same advice that I needed for myself, namely to find the things that trigger a flow state and adapt that to practicing.

By a flow state, I mean events that you can loose yourself in without being aware of time passing.  This might mean playing, or reading or working on your car.  It’s whatever event you can fully immerse yourself in.

For me, that’s reading, and then that’s guitar playing.  As a kid, I would read books constantly not being aware of what time had passed.  Guitar playing came a lot later and had a lot of extra baggage associated with it that had to be overcome to be in a flow state. (such as editing and analyzing what you’re playing as you play it – even having worked on that a lot I still find myself falling into that mode once in a while).

So I got back into reading books.  Physical books picked up from the library.  Serious reading where skimming was avoided (I found myself skimming sections to get to the next part and then coming back and re-reading things in a deeper way) and every word that was on the page came into the internal narrative of what I was reading.  When I lived in Boston, it was easy because it took at least 30 minutes each way to get anywhere by train, so I always brought a book with me and read it on the train.  But now that I drive everywhere, it’s taken a while to get back into the habit of REALLY reading something of substance (just like it’s taken a while to get back into the habit of walking places when you find yourself driving everywhere).

It’s easy to be dismissive of this.  After all to read a two to three sentence synopsis of a much deeper topic is easier, faster and easier to act on yes?

The short answer is no.  The longer answer is, it’s completely missing the point.

The Filter bubble

I was thinking a lot about Eli Pariser’s filter bubble book.  In a filter bubble, uncommon data is eliminated so that the more common data rises to the top of the searches.  So when you do a google search for something, you’re only skimming the surface of the data out there.  This is great when you want to find specific data (like a water table for a county for a specific year), but not so great when you’re looking for specific topics.

Years ago, my friend Randy saw a Charles Manson shirt and commented that people used faces like Manson and Hitler to be provocative because they weren’t well informed enough to find more relevant contemporary people.  They went with what was easy or immediately accessible.

So a filter bubble is like handing someone a 6-string guitar with only 2 strings and saying, “ok here’s a guitar.  Now go play “smoke on the water.”  You can play the main riff of the tune on 2 strings, but without the rest of the strings on the guitar you’re missing out on a lot.  In my case, it’s engaging in reading as a process to come to a deeper understanding of something, rather than developing a “hack” shortcut.

The synopsis approach in action

The reality of the above mentioned two to three-sentence synopsis for most people is some variation of this process:

1.  Read the synopsis.

2.  Do an internal litmus test to see if it seems plausible.

3.  Google the term to see if there’s a common consensus on the topic.

4.  If it’s determined to be correct, then it’s added to the list of things that they learned today,  filed it into memory and then transmitted to other people as knowledge.

In other words, it’s very rarely acted upon.  This is what happens when you are reacting to data all the time.  You get overwhelmed and can’t really internalize things.

Another YouTube Rant

It seems like every day someone is sending me some new YouTube link to some playalong or performance. You want to know why there are SO MANY videos of technical guitar videos on YouTube?

Because (in the scheme of things) it’s not that hard to do.

You could train a monkey to play the version of “flight of the bumblebee” that so many guitarists post (btw – I blame a Guitar Player transcription/lesson of Jennifer Batten for this version being in existence because that seems to be the one everyone is referencing for fingerings).  It’s not about music, it’s about getting a few specific techniques under your belt to meet a specific goal.  There’s nothing wrong with that, but it’s a limited end unto itself.

I pretty much stopped watching YouTube guitar videos because:

A:  I saw the filter bubble in action.  So many of the videos I saw were clearly guys who had watched the same video, or learned the same tune.

B:  I have my own thing to work on, so unless it’s really special, I really don’t care what other guitarists are doing.

So, I don’t care about shred videos on YouTube.  I don’t care that an 8 year old can play “Scarified” not all that well at near the recorded tempo.  What DO I care about then?

This in contrast is a lot harder:

This is making music.  This is what happens when a master musician becomes a shaman and invokes the spirit behind the song.  It’s about being completely in the moment.  It’s about having something to say and speaking it directly to other people.

It’s being in the flow and taking other people with you.

It’s about being in the present.  Not checking your email every 15 minutes to see if you’re missing something.

It’s about the duende moment.  The moment the hair stands up on your arms and you feel more alive than before.

That doesn’t happen online.  That doesn’t happen in a text.  That happens with people in a room sharing an honest naked moment.

Creating that moment starts with you, the performer being in the moment and bringing people there.

Being in the moment is something that has to be practiced.  Now, possibly more than ever.

That’s why I started working on things that fell into my flow state more often.  The more I enter flow, the more easily I can enter in in other areas of my life.  The more I can bring that when I perform.  The more I can create something beyond the veneer of flash and get to touching people in a real way.

So, that’s where I’m at.  A work in progress moving towards reconciling an analog past with a digital present and doing it (for now) increasingly offline.

As always, thanks for reading!  I hope this helps you in some way!

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New Music, New Shows, Gear News and Guit-A-Grip Posts

Hi Everyone,

This is just a brief update of new gear, news and music with some things that may be of interest to you.

New Project

I’m playing in a new project that’s currently an acoustic duo with an incredibly talented guitarist and artist form Iran named Farzad Golpeyagani who recently relocated to the capital district.   He has an extensive discography and portfolio of projects and you can see his website here.

For those of you starting new projects or developing new things, there may be several aspects of this that might be of interest to you.

  • I met Farzad at the Festival Cinema Invisible Film Fest back in June of this year.  People that I met at that event have since opened a series of friendships which has lead to other doors, opportunities and gigs for me.   What’s interesting about this to me is that I almost didn’t end up making it to the festival and if I didn’t have full passes for the festival – I might have missed it entirely.  So (for me) it’s yet another reminder that opportunities are made more than they are found.
  • While there are several reasons for playing as an acoustic duo (rather than starting an electric band) the primary reason is flexibility.  Years ago, I played in a live hip hop band, which I loved, but trying to schedule regular rehearsals and gigs with 6 people was a perpetual mess.  Our thinking behind starting as an acoustic duo is we can make a soft launch of the project, develop material and cultivate an audience in the short term and then expand the lineup out over time.  This will eventually give us the flexibility to be able to perform small shows as a duo or larger shows as a larger ensemble.

For now, this is our acoustic guitar duo project with heavy note density – expect tunes from and/or inspired by the musics of Iran, Turkey, Spain, Romania, Northern India, Japan and other parts of the world all rolled up into some kind of Kati roll / Sushi roll / Gumbo / Goulash. 

We’re working on a name and a logo (I’ve penciled in a name of KoriSoron for the time being).  Farzad and I have been been testing out some material with soft launches at open mics in the area that have gone over very well and now we have some actual shows coming up.

  • “The birthday show” – Saturday, August 23rd – The Moon and River Cafe in Schenectady 8pm – 10pm.  Several short sets to herald in some new material which also happens to mark my birthday on the following day.   As my gift to anyone there, the show has no cover, but supporting the venue with food or beverage purchases is encouraged.
  • Thursday, September 18th – Kickoff screening for Festival Cinema Invisible‘s monthly film series at Proctor’s Theatre. FCI will be showing an Iranian Film, “Common Plight”, serving tea from the fantastic Persian Bite on Jay Street in Schenectady and have a performance by the two of us.
  • Saturday, November 1st – Amsterdam Library Fundraiser. 6pm-9pm.  No information yet but you can check back with the Amsterdam Public Library website for details.

We should have a name, website, Audio/Video and other information soon….

New Gear

For this acoustic based project, I’ve gone back to the shed for getting the tunes together and back to basics for getting the sound I want.  This required some new tools and (for anyone interested) I’ve settled on a few items for live use.

Amps – Amps might seem like a strange place to start, but given that this is an acoustic-electric project, it’s the lynchpin that holds things together.  I’ve tried a bunch of amps and none of them touch the ZT Lunchbox Acoustic.

Lunchbox_Acoustic

I’ll have a full review up in the weeks ahead but for quality of sound, features, portability and price point, nothing else even comes close.  It’s the only acoustic amp I’ll use live now.  Farzad will be using a lunchbox acoustic for our project and he’s using the regular Lunchbox  for his live electric guitar performances as well.

Guitars – I think of all the time I spent trying to get my other acoustics to work in a live setting and now laugh that I didn’t just look at guitars that are designed for electro-acoustic applications and for my money the best in the field for that is Yamaha. I’m using an APX500 II and and APX700 12-string and they both work great for live use and I’m using Yamaha acoustic electric guitars exclusively moving forward.

The Ghost of Christmas Past

Years ago (as in about 6 or so), FnH guitar’s John Harper took in my custom double neck fretted/fretless that he and I designed in for some work.  The problem was that as the guitar was designed to replicate a Mosrite – the necks were too narrow for standard bridges.  So the solution was either to custom build replacement bridges or to make new necks.

New necks were made and the guitar (now forever dubbed “The Harper Albatross”) was delivered last Thursday.  Some features of this beast include:

  • The Albatross weights about 14 lbs and is about 20″ wide.  It’s HUGE!
  • It has one fretted and one fretless neck (both with a 25 1/2″ scale).
  • Both necks have bone nuts and locking Sperzel tuners. (The tuners are a major contributor to the overall weight so those may be going soon).
  • The fretless has a Fernandes Sustainer circuit and pickups in it.
  • The fretted has a gold foil in the neck position and a Lace Alumitone DeathBucker in the bridge position.
  • The fretless has a stop bridge the fretted has a floating Wilkinson bridge
  • Mouradian in Boston custom-made the gig bag for this guitar by modifying a keyboard bag design to fit it.  I love my Mono bags as well but my Mouradian bags are second to none for design, comfort and durability.  Here’s the guitar with the bag.

2014-08-10 09.13.00

Here’s another photo with more of a close up of the controls.

2014-08-10 09.13.27Look for some new material featuring this and the Yamaha guitars this Fall!

New Guit-A-Grip Posts

It’s been a while since I’ve announced any of these here so there may be some topics below that may be of interest to you.

  • In this post, I dissect the “$1.7 million” figure that was quoted for a former student of mine whose band signed to a major label.
  • In this post, I’ve posted an excerpt from one of my e-books that talks about the necessity for strong opinions in the arts.
  • In this post, I talk about the disadvantages of burning bridges to your career.
  • And in this post, I talk about how opportunities are sometimes wasted before they ever come to fruition.

In the weeks ahead, I’ll have the full audio for the panel discussions for artists from the Buckmoon Arts Festival and there’s a lot of GREAT insight and information for those of you who are trying to build your carer or get you business project off the ground.

In the meantime, that’s it for now!  As always, thanks for reading!

-SC