Melodic Patterns

The GuitArchitect’s Guide To Modes: Melodic Patterns

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If you are looking for new ways to explore  the fretboard, or new sounds to investigate – the books in The GuitArchitect’s Guide To…. series are for you!

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The GuitArchitect’s Guide To Modes: Melodic Patterns 

(333 pages)

melodic-patterns

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My sonic visualization system, GuitArchitecture,  utilizes an intuitive two-string method of understanding the guitar fingerboard in a logical and concise way where seven core fingerings for major, melodic minor and harmonic minor scales replace rote memorization with an intuitive overview that can be applied to any scale or modal system.

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In The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Modes: Melodic Patterns, I’ve taken the two-string approach and created a reference book of melodic permutations that allows the reader to generate an almost infinite number of unique melodic cells and sequences.

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Applicable to guitarists and bassists, this book is an invaluable resource for both compositional and improvisational material.

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The GuitArchitect’s Guide to Modes: Melodic Patterns

If you’ve ever looked at any instructional guitar material, you’ve probably come across some variation of the phrase, “Take this idea and transpose it to every other key”. In this book, I’ve taken a seed idea (a single two-string fingering for C Ionian) and then used a mathematical process called permutation, (which changes the sequence of how things are arranged) as a basis for creating unique melodic cells.

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This book not only details every possible permutation, but then goes on to show how to create every unique combination of them. These unique melodic cells can be used either on their own as compositional or improvisational ideas or combined with other melodic cells to create longer phrases.

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I’ve included jpegs of some of the pages from the Melodic Patterns book below.  Since the jpegs were converted from the pdf of the book, there’s some pixilation in the jpegs that is not present in the pdf but these will still give you an idea of what’s in the book. 

(Click on any graphic to see it as a larger size.)

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Reviews/Feedback on the GuitArchitect’s Guide To books:

“I’m really enjoying it thanks. It has a lot of ideas which you’ve laid out very well. I can see it being a valuable resource that I’ll refer back to for some time yet.”

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“Scott, there is a ton of good info in these books so I’ll be taking my time to work through them. From what I have accomplished so far, and what I have seen by scanning through the books, you have done an excellent job of envisioning a unique approach to all of this.”

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“The material really seems to be thorough and comprehensive and more importantly written in a nice, plain way that’s easy to understand. Great work!”

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“That was a great read, thanks very much.  It was bit hard pushing on though as I wanted to start working through some of the ideas in the earlier chapters as I read which is a great sign….”

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“Your books really are a terrific accomplishment. I wish i knew a small fraction of what was contained there.”

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“If I could sum up the entire work so far in three words, I’d call it ‘musician’s brain food’.”

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“Awesome, thank you very much, it’s been such a great idea sparker so far,”

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“The books are great. I have them loaded up on my kindle so i can use them and practice.”

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“Yes, they’re great. I think you have a really interesting approach.”

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” I highly appriciate the depth of which you went in to your subjects and all of the tabs and patterns are just awesome.  It will give me a great platform whenever I feel like writing some real music.”

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“Scott, thanks for that, I grabbed my guitar and got right into it. When I first learned how to play guitar I was learning by playing along with records and never learned to read music,play scales or any music theory, I’ve bought books but never saw anything that grabbed me and made sense like your books, so thanks for everything.”

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“I’m very much enjoying the guitarchitecture pdfs thanks. My head hasn’t (yet) exploded :-)”

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“Your approach seems a natural match to the way I conceptualise things, so I hope to pick up a lot.”

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“Been meaning to tell you that your material is fascinating. I’m an engineer, and I have to say your approach could easily be called ‘An Engineer’s Deconstruction of Harmonic and Melodic Concepts’. Kudos, sir.”

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Print editions of this book are available individually here (lulu.com) or on Amazon (amazon.comamazon.co.uk, or amazon.fr).


 

3 thoughts on “Melodic Patterns

  1. Hi,
    I’m an advanced jazz guitarist, older and got back to woodshedding about 10 years ago. I play on standards, lots, with a eye to making them fresh. I play some fusion. Would you suggest any particular books?I heard about you when I was searching for information on Sheets of Sound book that I’ve been working on.
    Thanks,
    John

    • Hi John,

      Thanks for the question.

      In terms of my books, they all do very different things.

      Melodic patterns looks at combinatorial for melodic sequencing taking one patterns and adapting it to the process. It’s a reference book – but for something you can just turn a page to and find something that makes you go, “Oh I never thought of that before” – it’s a deep tool for compositional or improvisational material.

      Harmonic Combinatorics takes the same idea from melodic patterns and applies it to spread voicings. It’s also very much a reference book like Melodic patterns – You can get a lot of unconventional chord voicings here or really open up your scales in an intervallic way.

      Chord Scales is probably the one of the most instructional books I’ve ever written. In addition to being an index of all possible chord scales – it takes one chord scale and really puts it through the motions melodically and harmonically. If you’re looking for new sounds it’s a good one.

      Symmetrical Twelve-Tone Patterns has been revised and it’s probably the best book I’ve ever written. If you want to navigate chord changes with intervallic intertia – you’ll get some great ideas from this book.

      I’m quite fond of my Pentatonic book. It’s a great introduction to my fretboard visualization process and can be adapted to any scale – but it might be too rudimentary for you if you’ve been playing standards for a while.

      Finally, Positional Exploration takes the 1-2-3-4 exercise on it’s head and creates a lot of controlled chaos in position. One reader said, “I sound like Stravinsky whenever I play through the examples in this thing”.

      So those are my recommendations for my books. For other books you may want to read one of my Guitar-Muse articles:

      http://www.guitar-muse.com/13-jazz-books-every-guitarist-should-read-and-own-3697
      http://www.guitar-muse.com/for-your-musical-book-shelf-7-books-for-learning-and-self-discovery-3756
      http://www.guitar-muse.com/9-music-business-books-every-guitarist-needs-to-read-if-not-own-3798

      I hope that helps! If you have other questions let me know!

      Scott

      • Hi Scott,
        Thanks. There is a lot in your books that I can use. Many of the jazz improv books have you do all the work to translate melodic ideas. It is helpful to get some guidance. I’ll pick up one of your books to play with.
        I discovered you through the 13 jazz books article. I was looking for something helpful insights to working with Sheets of Sound. I’ve been working through lots of Jack’s ideas in the last year.
        Best,
        John

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