“This Is The Rough Hewn Trio – Now Available On Bandcamp

Happy New Year.  It’s been a bit since there was a post.  This won’t really count as one either.  It’s just a short update with a few announcements.

1.  This (my instrumental trio project with Drummer Craig Bunch and Chapman Stick / Warr Guitarist Chris Lavender)

rough-hewn-cover-web

is out now on Bandcamp (https://roughhewntrio.bandcamp.com/releases).  You can pay what you want to purchase it.   I don’t think my friend Andre would mind me stealing his FB description, “proggy, fusiony, ambient-tinged deliciousness in a Holdsworth / Zappa / Crimson vein”.  It’s got all sorts of influences floating through it, and it’s fun for the whole family.  You can stream it for free (up to 3 times) or pay what you want to purchase it.  I hope you’ll check it out!

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2.  I LOVE Vimeo, but it’s a little too restrictive for SOME (good) people – so I’ll have a YOUTUBE channel up soon.  I’ll put some never before seen (and heard) things up there.  Maybe I’ll even put up a clip of my “Salt Licks” guitar instructional video I shot with my good friend Randy Bird at Berklee. : )  Maybe not.  We’ll see….I’ll announce specifics here once I get some content up.

3.  The second KoriSoron 5-track EP  is done in terms of music.  Big thanks to John Chiara at Albany Audio Associates for going above and beyond!  Farzad from KoriSoron is working on the CD graphics and I expect that we’ll have that out by the end of the month or February.

4.  I’ll have some of my back catalog up online in the weeks ahead as well.

5.  I’m just finishing up pre-production for my solo acoustic release tenatively titled, “Eel – Ecch – Trick – A – Coup – Stick”  It’s a WIDE swath of music and might cover 2 CDs.  I’m hoping to release it in the Spring or Summer depending on whether it becomes a full length or 2 EPs.

6.  I’m back into electric playing these days and pulling something together along the lines of Hassan Hakmoun’s Zahar performance on Night Flight with Hahn Rowe and Yuval Gabay and mixed in with some of the Balkan & Middle Eastern music I don’t suspect I’ll ever get away from.  Right now the goal is Ass Shakin’ music with burning guitar and vocals.

7.  I’ve been thinking a LOT about this website and the purposes (and people) it is supposed to serve.  In a re-branding initiative this year, I suspect that this blog will remain and another site may come up in its place, but completely re-working this may be an option as well.  File that under “Summer Project”.

Some other things afoot too tentative to mention here, so that’s it for now.  I really hope you’ll check out the Rough Hewn EP!

As always – thanks for reading!

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Powerpuff, New(?) Music and TEDx Video Is Live

Hi Everyone,

A few quick updates.

  1.  Apparently, I missed an ultra-brief window that the episode of the (2016) Powerpuff girls I played on (“Electric Buttercup”) was up on the Cartoon Network site – but I have word that the episode will be broadcast TV on November 28th – so I should have a link to that soon.
  2. First “New Music” Item – Back in 2011 – I played on an Onibaba recording session for bassist Daren Burns that got me fired from John French’s recording / band (a topic for a whole other post).  Daren previously released one cd of that session (Disintegration of Secrets/Apparitions of Kings available on Bandcamp here.) but he just released the rest of the session this week.  That CD, Anesthesia is out now and you can purchase (or listen to) that here.  In addition to Daren and myself, you also get Vinny Golia, George McMullen and drummer Craig Bunch adding to the general disarray.
  3. Second “New Music” Item – Back in 2012 – right before I left sunny CA – I was playing in a project called the Rough Hewn Trio.  We recorded some tracks and then entered a bizarre black hole where the project was pronounced dead and resuscitated several times.  After MANY false starts – the mixes for the tracks with myself, drummer Craig Bunch and Chapman Stick / Warr guitarist Chris Lavender are finally signed off on and are in the mastering stages so we hope to have that out by the end of the year.
  4. Third New Music Item (This one actually IS new) – KoriSoron recorded some tracks for our second ep – featuring our most challenging material.  We’re in the process of mixing that now and anticipate having that mixed and mastered by the end of the year.
  5. Non-Music Item  – Festival Cinema Invisible – an organization dedicated to bringing invisible films from the Middle East to the Capital Region of New York – is having its 6th annual 2-day film Festival at Proctor’s Theater in Schenectady in April of 2017.  I’m the General and Artistic Director of the Festival and this year’s Festival will be culled from over 1200 submissions (on its way to 1300 by the deadline) sent to us from over 100 countries around the globe.  You can find out more about the festival (and FCI) here.

My TedX Schenectady Talk / Presentation

The video of my Ted X Schenectady talk (with a KoriSoron performance) Past Forward – which dealt with the intersection of art, commerce and scarcity was posted this week.

The video is embedded below (or linked here if you have a browser issue)

For those of you interested in the process  of developing the talk, I talk about that process (and some of the performance challenges like not having a lavalier or hand held mike or having the song form change unexpectedly while you’re soloing) here.  I wish I been able to just just do the performance OR the speech – I would have been in a better frame of mind to roll with the punches of changes that can happen in a performance.  But chalk it up to experience.

The talk is supposed to feel loose and conversational but the reality of delivering something like this in a specific time line means that you have to have it pretty structured (with some improvisation thrown in to keep it from feeling like a PowerPoint presentation).

I’ve included the last of the 15-20 drafts the talk went through below.  It’s not a transcription of the talk I did – but it covers the bulk of the points I made (and also some points I cut in the interest of time).

I hope you dig it!

As always – thanks for reading!

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Scott Collins – TedX Schenectady Talk – 2016

Hi. I’m Scott Collins. I’m a guitarist in KoriSoron a Schenectady-based trio. We create original music based on traditions from across the globe.

The title of this presentation is Past Forward. Past forward, in its most simple definition, involves taking material from the past and revitalizing it by making it contemporary which is what we do in KoriSoron.

I’ll talk more about Past Forward and KoriSoron but to do that I need to put that in the broader context of scarcity.

For much of history the value of music has been based on scarcity.

By way of example let’s consider music in the time of Beethoven.  The only way you could hear music was to be in the presence of someone playing it live.

You might actually be able to perform the music yourself if you a.) owned an instrument, b.) had formal training and c.) were one of the few people that could actually get access to (and afford) sheet music.

Access to music was limited to exposure and modes of transportation. It was also limited in that only a handful of people had the tools to perform that music.

This remains unchanged until sometime after 1877. Since we’re in Schenectady I’ll give Thomas Edison a shout out by name for his invention that recorded sound to a wax cylinder as the first major change in this performance model.

Edison’s invention allowed people to collect live performances and listen to them over and over again. For the first time listening to music shifted from something that came from a live musician to something that came from a device like a radio or a record and a record player.

The equipment used to record music was prohibitively expensive and required substantial skills to use and maintain. Musicians couldn’t do this on their own as it was financially beyond their means. Companies looking to sell records provided an advance to musicians to record their music (and then produced records that they marketed and distributed). This gave tremendous power to the record labels who had a virtual monopoly on the funding, recording and distribution of their recordings.

A perfect storm came together in the form of a technological revolution that completely undermined the scarcity model.

  • The cost of the computers came down to the point where most people could afford them and the internet increased its depth and breadth and became a destination for people to actively go to.
  • Music recording software became powerful enough to replace physical recording components and musicians began to record at home. Additionally, the internet allowed them to distribute music on their own and the amount of available music expanded exponentially each year (and continues to do so).
  • Mp3s and file sharing allowed people to find music online instead of having to go to a retail store.

File sharing services like Napster allowed people to download music for free, but could be cumbersome to use. Companies like Pandora sensed the real desire in the market for people to listen to music on demand and paved the way for current streaming services like Spotify.

The music industry was thrown into chaos because their entire business model was based on the ability to limit people’s access to music and create a demand for CDs, LPs, DVDs etc. and those physical objects were no longer necessary to listen to music.

Three basic approaches emerged to deal with this.

  1. The major labels tried to fight this change and stay with a model that worked on attempting to create scarcity to create demand.  It was a dismal failure that (with several other factors) destroyed the industry and only left 3 major record labels standing.
  2. Some musicians, often those who used to be on major labels and were now independent, saw the changes that were occurring but didn’t understand the needs of the market. So they emulated the record company model and also attempted to create artificial scarcity for their own music. When well-meaning fans got excited about tracks and posted them online – they chastised the fans and attempted to browbeat the audience into caring about the music industry and how much money there were losing in the new business model.

Musicians being musicians began to undercut one another to get to competitive pricing and soon they were giving their music away with the hope of generating income live. Incidentally, many live venues started to succumb to cultural changes brought about by the internet (people who stayed home to stream movies on platforms like Netflix) and were unable to stay open making it even more challenging for musicians to derive an income.

3.  The third approach is a present day approach. Music is ubiquitous so let’s create opportunity by finding the real demands of the market and meeting those needs

People are not buying cds. Based on Apple’s latest iTunes stats, they’re not even buying single tracks online anymore. They’re paying for services that stream whatever they want, whenever they want it.

But people don’t really care about streaming. What they’re really paying for is access to songs. More specifically what they are paying for is a feeling. They want to pump their fist in the air and mouth the words to their favorite songs. The real demand is to be moved emotionally.

Several years ago, I wrote an ebook called An Indie Music Wake Up Call. I ended the book with this quote:

“’Popular’ music in the 21st century will not be marked by musicians who play at being business people, it will be marked by entrepreneurs who happen to play and write well and firmly understand where the bottom line is.”

The bottom line is doing what you do in an honest and sincere way and cultivating tribes of people who identify with what you do and are moved by it. That feeling is a scarce thing. It is something people nurture and support.

I started the presentation talking about music in the time of Beethoven and in many ways musicians are coming back to the business model where music is something that is experienced rather than a genie locked in a digital bottle for sale.

In contrast to the professional musicians in Beethoven’s time were the musicians who performed folk music. This was communal music that was passed down aurally to each subsequent generation. It is no small irony that this music is now often experienced by audiences in a non-communal setting through recordings or in a formal setting such as concert halls.

Music is a language. In KoriSoron we take inspiration from a variety of folk music from around the globe and create original music based on that vocabulary. I can pick up words, phrases and even grammar by listening to others speak, but expressing the poetry of a foreign language authentically requires a context that is outside of my experience. So what is a musician from upstate New York to do?     I write my own poetry. I use the music from other cultures that speaks to me and moves me as a platform for creating new music to move other people.

The true beauty of music is that while it can be created on an intellectual level, it communicates to others emotionally. You don’t need to speak our language to be moved by it, you only need to listen.

Finally I’d like to talk about Past forward – a term I got from Ellie Lee, an animator and film maker I knew in Boston who now works in LA. Past Forward was a phenomenal event that she curated in a loft in Boston’s Chinatown. On Past Forward nights, people would go through an lightly marked door and pay a small cover to see films she brought to screen (often with the film maker in tow), eat homemade baked goods, drink beer and watch bands play. And there was a real community of people who came out to those events.

That DIY ethos of creating a scene was SO influential to me. That idea of sharing things that move you to move other people as well. It is at the heart of what I do as a guitarist. As a human being. It is at the heart of KoriSoron.

If what you want in the world doesn’t exist, you either wait for someone to make it or you make it yourself.  

I seek to speak to people and move them and truly moving people is an uncommon thing. It is scarce. It has value. It is worth doing.

Thank you.

“New” Recordings Announced for 2016

Hi Everyone!

Hapy pre-4th of July for those of you who live in the states.  This is just a quick update of recent developments for projects I’m working on.  I should have a new post up within the week.

Rough Hewn Trio (!!)

File deeply under “The power of perseverance” following an intensive several days of digital intervention with Craig Bunch – the Rough Hewn trio tracks recorded at Chez Bunch’s with Stick / Warr guitar player Chris Lavender and myself back in 2011 will FINALLY see the light of day.

The 3-song ep will include a new Malian guitar inspired re-working of Bloodsucker, Chris Lavender’s 232 and a Zappa-inspired original I penned, Jerry goes to Frankiewood, aka When Hollywood went to Frankie. 

We had a version of Carl Stalling’s Powerhouse that we tracked but the file got corrupted (along with some of the other tracks we revisited).  I MAY have a demo version that we can put up online as a hidden track (the danger of not finishing something immediately is that it takes FOREVER to get done) – but nevertheless – man am I psyched for some of this stuff to get out into the world.

In the meantime, here’s a video of the Rough Hewn Trio playing Bloodsucker live (it is unbelievable to me just how much footage of us exists ALL with Craig Bunch front and center and no one else in camera shot!)

I’ll have ordering information up once this is released (Initial mixing is done.  We have another revision and then mastering and duplication – I expect it’ll be out in August or September 2016).


Onibaba

Bassist and Composer Daren Burns released the first part of this session (Consisting of several short individual pieces) several years ago but the second half of the session (one continuous take of several different pieces) just got mastered and will get released this Fall.

From Daren Burns’ description on Vimeo:

“Onibaba exists between composition and improvisation and is described as being somewhere between the light and the dark, the ethereal and the earthly – Creative Music. Created by Daren Burns in 2006, the band synthesizes its sound by using elements of the Chicago avant-garde, jazz, rock, world, techno, noise, and classical, to create a new type of fusion that is definitely not the smooth, funky jazz of the 80’s and 90’s, but a new living music.

Here are some videos from a performance in 2010


Onibaba is:

Daren Burns – bass

Craig Bunch – drums (in the videos Joe Berardi – drums)

Scott Collins – guitar

Vinny Golia – woodwinds

Kio Griffith – live video

Geroge McMullen – trombone

© Urban Nerds 2010″


KoriSoron

We’ve completed initial tracking for Five tunes for our second EP with John Chiara recording.  Our first Ep was a live EP but for this one we wanted to incorporate more production (while still maintaining live energy).  The most intensive material in our set will be on this one!  We’ll be continuing to record and mix this summer.  We hope to have the EP out by September / October of this year.

We have shows booked for September (including a TEDx Schenectady event) and October and expect to have additional shows booked soon for later this fall.


Solo Acoustic

“Eel-Ech!-trick-a-coup-stick” – is the tentative title of a solo acoustic instrumental recording I’ve been working on.  Tracking in August and released this Fall.  Right now there’s a Celtic / Bluegrass flatpicking piece, a Mali-inspired fingerstyle piece, a 2-handed piece, a loop / improv based work and possibly – an obscure instrumental cover.


Mas!

There are some other REALLY COOL things in the pipeline!  I’ll fill you in as soon as I can.

Thanks for your patience and thanks for reading  I’m really excited about all of the things coming out this year and I look forward to sharing it with you!

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Rough Hewn Trio Live In Echo Park October 14th

Pasadena, CA:

The Rough Hewn Trio will be performing on Friday, October 14th at the Tribal Cafe in Echo Park/LA, CA.

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Tribal Café October 14th Poster


Coming off of a recent recording stint,  we’ll be bringing rough-hewn originals and raspy renditions of fine European craftsmanship.

Other guests – TBA – You may see a short Dumb and Drummer set and a solo acoustic set by me is a strong possibility as well.

If you’re in the LA area, and like improvised dreamlike textures, cartoon music or odd time Balkan tunes churned through an instrumental trio drop on by.

As my imaginary cousin Gary used to say, “It don’t cost no cover and the band is good too.”

If you’re in the area it should be a lot of fun!

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The 2 for 1: Rough Hewn Trio and Dumb and Drummer Live in Echo Park

Hello Everyone,

Just a final plug for a show that’s happening  tonight Friday, July 15th at the Tribal Cafe in Echo Park/LA, CA.

Dumb and Drummer is a duo I have with Rough Hewn Trio drummer Craig Bunch that’s been playing off and on for the last couple of years.  We keep threatening to record something and will finally be doing so this summer.  Typically the sets are 100% improvised, but tonight we’ll be playing tunes – so it’ll be a 50-50 mix.  There’s a country-ish tune, a hindi inspired jam and an Enigmatic freak out in the works.  We start at 8pm.

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Rough Hewn Trio is also slated to record some things this summer.  Tonight we’ll be bringing some Balkan music, a Hungarian fusion workout, a new Malian guitar inspired re-working of Bloodsucker, Lavender’s 232 and a Zappa-ish original, Jerry goes to Frankiewood.  If there’s time we may get an encore in. This starts at 9:45 ish.

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And of course, King Courtney will be putting up her dukes and playing with them as well – so expect her band to come out swinging at 1/4 to 9.

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Yes – Carmageddon starts at midnight tonight – but we’ll be all tucked away by then and hopefully so will everyone else there.

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This is the last show on the books for the next month or two while we get into the studio and knock out some tracks.  Hope to see you there!

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Putting The Trio In Rough Hewn Trio Or Some Upcoming Shows

We’ve booked a couple of shows around Chris’ summer tour with Martin Fabricius and Craig’s ongoing tour of regional correctional facilities.

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In chronological order:

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  • Saturday, April 30 · 2:00pm – 3:00pm UC Irvine, Claire Trevor School of the Arts, Winifred Smith Hall – 4002 Mesa Road – Irvine, CA – iPhone Not Required (but bring’m if you got’m) i.e. Lavender’s Grad Recital
  • Friday, May 27 – Tribal Café – 1651 West Temple Street Los Angeles, CA 90026-5026 (213) 483-4458
    Yes Memorial Day Weekend.  No – we’re not sure who’s going to be in town to be there. Yes it will be awesome. Starts at 7:30 – bands TBA
  • Friday, July 15th – Tribal Café (Do you see a trend here) Starts at 7:30 – bands TBA

Here’s the info for the Irvine show from Chris.  This is going to be a really cool recital that will feature audience members playing with the band using Chris’ Thumbafon iphone ap.

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iPhone Not Required (but bring’m if you got’m)

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Saturday, April 30 · 2:00pm – 3:00pm

UC Irvine, Claire Trevor School of the Arts, Winifred Smith Hall

4002 Mesa Road

Irvine, CA

This is the penultimate performance of my graduate work, which is centered around the investigation of using mobile devices as a means toward audience collaborated performance. It’s an epic social/musical experiment* that YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS!

Performance starts at 2pm.

Checkout www.thumbafon.com for information on the iPhone App which will be used during the performance.

Featuring the Rough Hewn Trio”

Finally if you want to get a sense of the mellower side of our ensemble:

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Rough Hewn Trio Live @ Tribal Cafe Friday 4/15/11

Hi Everyone,

Just a quick plug for a show featuring not one but two groups I’m playing in that’s happening Friday, April 15th at the Tribal Cafe (1651 West Temple Street Los Angeles, CA 90026-5026 (213) 483-4458) from 7:30 pm – 11 pm.

The Rough Hewn Trio –  an instrumental trio consisting of Chris Lavender on Chapman stick or  Warr guitar, Craig Bunch on drums and myself on guitar will be playing a combination of pre-composed and improvised material.

To get a feel for what the shows will be like here’s an mp3 of a live excerpt from an improvisation we did this fall (now an actual composition called bloodsucker).

I’ll also be performing in Duodenum, an improvising duo with Carmina Escobar.  You can get the general vibe of the performance from this improvisation with Mia Mikela (aka solu) or  this clip or from this one.

The show will also feature the phenomenal talents of both  La Sirène (An adventurous improv trio featuring Cathlene Pineda (keys), Eric Klerks (bass) and Trevor Anderies (drums) (a recent mp3 is here) and Linda Mark (some mp3s of her band Dorothy Feels is here).

Note:

Mp3 playback is sometimes a little glitchy in Safari.  If it doesn’t play in your web browser – you may just have to reload/refresh the playback page.

Here’s the Schedule:

Linda Mark 7:30 – 8:00
La Sirène 8:15- 9:00
Rough Hewn Trio 9:15-10:00
Duodenum 10:15 – 10:45

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